Points Of Interest

Point #1
Let's Begin

45 Beaver Pl, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Starting Point

Let’s get started. With the public Gardens on your left, go ahead and start walking west toward Arlington Street. When you get to the corner, you’ll notice a path on your right that will take you to our destination. By the way, that enormous park across the street is Boston Common, and yes, UCPlaces has a tour for that. Check it out later.

Point #2
Directions

Arthur Fiedler Footbridge, Arthur Fiedler Footbridge, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Yep, this is the path I was talking about. The ramp ahead will wrap around, just follow it up and over the bridge.

Point #3
Aurther Fiedler Footbridge

Storrow Dr, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Bridge
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Fiedler

Welcome to the Arthur Fiedler Footbridge! If you’re looking for an easy way to get across Storrow Drive without having cars drive right at you, you have come to the right place. This bridge allows you and others to travel to the Esplanade that sits along the Charles River without having to look both ways first. Nothing like getting hit by a car to ruin a perfectly good day.

Point #4
Arthur Fiedler Footbridge Part II

Storrow Dr, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Footbridge
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Fiedler

This bridge, named after Arthur Fiedler, was built in 1953 and dedicated to Fiedler for his contribution of music to the general public of Boston. In 1929 he began a campaign with the purpose of bringing classical music to the public. One year later he was named conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, which became so well-known and loved that it sold over fifty million records ! To this day there are still classical concerts going on and are free to all. This path loops around again on the other side of Storrow Drive. Just keep following it. We are going to turn right when we get to the bottom of the bridge.

Point #5
Directions

Storrow Dr, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Hey, pay attention. I need you to turn right. And then your next right, too.

Point #6
Directions

1 David G Mugar Way, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Here’s our next right!

Point #7
Directions

47 David G Mugar Way, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

You’re so good at following directions! Stay to the left now.

Point #8
General George Patton Statue

47 David G Mugar Way, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Statue
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_S._Patton

Don’t forget to stay to the left. In just a bit you’re going to see a statue on your right, I’ll tell you a little about it now and when you’re done checking it out, keep heading straight and curve to the left with the path. This dashing statue of a man you’re about to see is none other than General George Smith Patton Jr. Mr. Patton was born in 1885 in San Gabriel, California, though his family originated in Virginia. His family had a long history of military service which played a big role in Patton deciding to serve as well. He attended and graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1909, and soon after had his first experience in battle. In 1915, Patton led cavalry troops against Poncho Villa at the U.S.- Mexican border. Then two years later when the U.S. entered World War I, he set sail for Europe where he became the first officer to be assigned to the new U.S. Tank Corps. It was around this time that he gained an honorable reputation for his strength in leadership and skills in tank warfare. Patton went on to serve cavalry units across the United States and in 1940 earned the rank of colonel. During World War II, Patton led the 7th army through its invasion of Sicily and northern France. Later that year his forces played a major role in defeating the Germans at the Battle of the Bulge and in capturing 10,000 miles of German territory, all of which aided in the ending of the Nazi regime and liberation of Germany. Not long after, Patton died in December of 1945. In 1953,this bronze statue of General George Patton was built to remember his major contributions and keep his legacy alive.

Point #9
Hatch Memorial Shell

47 David G Mugar Way, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction :
http://www.hatchshell.com/events.php

Turn left. This beautiful amphitheater you see to your right as we’re walking is called the Hatch Memorial Shell This was originally built from wood in 1928, and as a side note, do you know what else happened in 1928? The first loaves of machine-wrapped sliced bread were sold in the US. Now that was a year to celebrate! Back to the shell - it was first used for a concert on July 4, 1929, with Arthur Fiedler conducting the Boston Pops Orchestra. The permanent shell came 11 years later, made possible by a donation from Maria Hatch, to build a memorial for her late brother, Edward. Hence the name, “Hatch Shell”. In preparation for its 50th anniversary in 1991, it underwent significant renovation and repair, along with modernizing its acoustics. Bostonian Howard Brickman, a master craftsman specializing in wood floors, re-created the intricate interior paneling of the shell by hand. Now that’s talent. The grassy area to your left has become a favorite for visitors to bring a blanket, picnic cooler, and family members for a perfect way to spend a warm summer evening. Stay on the path going straight as we walk past the Hatch Memorial Shell.

Point #10
Directions

47 David G Mugar Way, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Keep heading straight and when the path forks, stick to the right. As you cross the bridge you’ll be able to see the docks on your right where locals can rent slots for their seaworthy transportation. And for those who don’t own a boat, but still want to live out their dream of being Captain Jack Sparrow for a day, there are boats available to rent. And if Jack Sparrow doesn’t quite suit you - this is Boston, baby, you can have whatever name you want, oh Captain, my Captain.

Point #11
Directions

Fiedler Field, Charles River Esplanade, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Nice job on remembering to go right when the path forked! Just up ahead I’m going to tell you a little bit about the Charles River and Storrow Lagoon as you take your time and enjoy the scenery. Not only should you be thinking about what you’d be called as a captain, you might want to think about what you’re going to name your boat. These are all very important things to have ready, because a distant relative you’ve never met might leave you a brand new boat in their will. You never know, anything is possible.

Point #12
Storrow Lagoon

Fiedler Field, Charles River Esplanade, Boston, MA 02114, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Lagoon
https://onthegrid.city/boston/back-bay/esplanade-storrow-lagoon

To your right is the Charles River and on your left will be the Storrow Lagoon. Don’t worry, there aren’t any swamp monsters here… or are there? Before 1910, this area known as Boston's Back Bay, was not a fun place to be as a nearby dam stopped sewage from draining into the sea, which in turn, kept the stench nice and close. Makes me gag just thinking about it. Bostonian’s, sick of the smell, built a dam which created the Charles River. In the 1930’s, with the stench gone and more people wanting to spend time at the bay, Arthur Shurcliff created the Starrow lagoon to give boats a place to dock and provide shelter for canoes. Because it was so successful, it led to the creation of new pathways, monuments, and even more lagoons like this one. With all of the improvements, additional trees, paths, and monuments, this beautiful lagoon has an endless amount of opportunities for fun and adventure within and around it. So take your time and enjoy a break from the crazy business of life. I’m gonna be quiet for a while so you can take it all in as you walk.

Point #13
Directions

Charles River Esplanade, Charles River Esplanade, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I really do love the view of the city across the water. Sorry, I had been quiet for so long, I was feeling a little left out. If you happen to have come up with your Captain name and a name for your boat, tag us and let me know! And it can’t be Captain Underpants, apparently that’s already taken. Just keep walking.

Point #14
Directions

Charles River Esplanade, Charles River Esplanade, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I think I will be Captain Bilbo Baggins and my boat will be...My Precious. Follow the curve to your left.

Point #15
Directions

334 Back St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

As you cross the little bridge up ahead, If you look to your right you’ll see this is the point at which the Charles River flows into the Storrow Lagoon. Thanks again, Aurthur Shircliff! This lagoon was a great idea.

Point #16
Directions

334 Back St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Keep heading straight and follow the path as it curves to the left. That will put you on the Dr Paul Dudley White Bike Path.

Point #17
Directions

334 Back St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Remember to stay to your left here. We are only gonna be on the bike path for a minute.

Point #18
Directions

334 Back St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Take a sharp right and head up the ramp.

Point #19
Directions

334 Back St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

And we’re walking.

Point #20
Directions

334 Back St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

We’re getting closer to the next half of our adventure! Take the bridge back over Storrow Drive.

Point #21
Directions

334 Back St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I hope you like shopping, cause baby, have I got a treat in store for you!

Point #22
Directions

334 Back St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

When it’s safe, cross the street and stay walking down Fairfield Street for about five blocks, maybe 5.3 blocks if you really want me to be as precise as possible. Don’t worry though, I’ll check in on you at the halfway point. You should be walking with Fairfield Street on your left.

Point #23
Directions

Commonwealth Avenue & Fairfield St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

About halfway there! If you’ve ever wondered about the Newman School in Boston - it’s just down Marlborough Street to your left. And no, it’s not named after Newman, the mailman from Seinfield, although - it would take the mailman’s annual salary to send one of your kid’s to Newman. Yowzers.

Point #24
Directions

256 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Turn right here, onto this walkway, I want to take you on the scenic route!

Point #25
Boston Women's Memorial

256 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Memorial
https://www.boston.gov/departments/womens-advancement/boston-womens-memorial

This is the Boston Women’s Memorial. It was unveiled on October 25th, 2003. One of my favorite parts of this memorial is how the women are posed. It’s like you can see what Phillis Wheatley, the first african-American woman to publish a book of poetry, looked like as she contemplated how to put her thoughts into words that would strike a chord with its readers. Or Lucy Stone, who was the first woman from Massachusetts to earn a college degree, as she was writing the difficult letter to her mother, to help her understand the only way she could be true to herself was to fight for women’s rights, as “that course of conduct appears best calculated to promote the highest good of the world.” Can you imagine if they had created a modern day Lucy Stone statue? Just wouldn’t have quite the same effect seeing her sitting there, cell phone in hand, texting her mom. And then there’s Abigail Adams, standing strong, as she is known as - listen carefully - the first Second Lady and the second First Lady of the United States. It’s like figuring out ‘Who’s on First’, regardless, she was a force to be reckoned with when it came to supporting Women’s Rights. That was evident when she wrote her husband, John Adams, “Remember the Ladies” which has been interpreted as her way of urging him and the other members of the Continental Congress to not forget about the nation's women when fighting for America's independence. Knowing Abigail’s fierceness, I would translate it as, “You think the revolutionary war is bad, you wait and see the war I’m gonna wage if you even think about ignoring women’s rights of equality.” But that’s just me. We only have one more turn to make! Are you as excited as I am? I know your credit card company is!

Point #26
Directions

279a Newbury St, Boston, MA 02115, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Let’s turn left here and make our way across Commonwealth Avenue and in just two short blocks we’re going to be at a shoppers paradise!

Point #27
Newbury Street

279a Newbury St, Boston, MA 02115, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Newbury Street
http://www.newbury-st.com/

We made it!!!! Are you ready to take a step back into the 19th century? I sure hope so because that’s where I’m taking you! Let’s turn left and start walking down this beautiful strip known as Newbury Street. This street’s first appearance was in 1857 when dirt was used to fill the harbor - before that, in the 1800’s, instead of walking right now, you’d be bobbing in the water. As you meander along, you’ll find unique shops that seem to be calling you by name, and the kind of food that makes your mouth water the minute you smell the aroma coming out of the restaurant doors. You’ll see. Feel free to take you time, do some shopping, dining, drinking, whatever you feel like, and as you make your way, I’ll pop in now and then to say hi and share an interesting fact or two.

Point #28
Directions

181 Newbury St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

While the bustle of shoppers and excitement is in the air with new discoveries, it was an entirely different story in the beginning. Newbury street is unique for many reasons, one of which is it’s high-end reputation which started over 100 years ago. By the 1880s, everyone wanted to live on Newbury street. Living here was equivalent to wearing a big hat that says “Official Exclusive Member of the Prestigious and Exclusive”. With the massive houses and depiction of Boston’s fashion and style, this was the neighborhood to live in. Since we can’t actually live on this street, I wonder if we’re still considered prestigious and exclusive by shopping here? Regardless, in my opinion, you are amazing wherever you are, and my opinion is quite prestigious in and of itself.

Point #29
Directions

105 Newbury Street, Third Floor, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Did you think I had forgotten about you? Never. No one is exactly sure at what point Newbury changed from being a residential neighborhood to becoming one of the most expensive streets in the world. That’s right, this “Rodeo Drive of the East” holds some of the most eclectic high-end boutiques and dining establishments that you won’t find anywhere else. One salon owner, who was lucky enough to land his salon here, said, “You go off Newbury Street and you’re a second-class citizen”. Now we don’t want that, so maybe we should find a way to live here.

Point #30
The End

1 Newbury St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : The End

Ultimately, Newbury Street embodies a rich urban and retail environment not often found in American cities. I hope you had a great time on our scenic tour of the lagoon, spent way too much money at the boutique’s, and filled your belly at one of the amazing restaurants along the way. Tag us and let us know what your favorite part of Newbury Street was and I’ll make sure to check it out next time I’m there. From here, you can head north on Arlington Street, with the Public Garden on your right, and it will take you back to where we started. In the meantime, keep exploring and touring with UCPlaces, where the fun never ends. Although, it does end, because this is the end of this tour, so what I meant to say was, keep exploring and touring with UCPlaces, where the fun never ends after it ends. Much better. Until next time, so long and happy touring!