Points Of Interest

Point #1
Cheers Bar

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Famous Bar
https://cheersboston.com/

What better place to start our tour than right here, at the classic Cheers Bar. Some of you may recognize it from the famous American TV show ‘Cheers’. It was a sitcom about a cozy bar in Boston (obviously) where the bar owner, Sam Malone, who played for the Boston Red Sox, treats the customers like family, somewhere people can go after a long day of work, sit on their favorite chair at the bar and let their worries go. It’s a place where when you walk in everyone knows your name. While the sitcom was airing, I’m pretty sure there wasn’t a person in America that didn’t know the words to the show’s theme song. I’ll sing a couple lines for you to help jog your memory and if you’ve never heard it before now, well then, you’re welcome! Where everybody knows your name And they're always glad you came Catchy, right? The pub was originally known as Bull & Finch, but with the popularity of the sitcom, it changed its name to, ‘Cheers’. Smart move, Bull & Finch. If you want to head in and grab a quick drink before we go, awesome, otherwise, let’s get this tour started! When it’s safe, cross to the otherside of Beacon St. Once you’re across, take a left, and make your way to the entrance at the corner of Beacon. This is where we’ll start touring Boston Common!

Point #2
Directions

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I knew you’d be good at this. You’d be surprised how often I have to say, “no, your other left” when people turn right instead of left. I know you might be tempted to enter the Common here, but ignore that temptation and keep going till you reach the corner.

Point #3
Directions

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

As this is an off-road tour, I’ll give you more specific directions as we go so we can always be on the right path. Sometimes I’ll give you the directions first so you can enjoy wandering around some of the bigger monuments and not get confused as to which path you’ll need to take when we move on to our next stop. For example: When you reach the corner, turn right, into Boston Common, and head straight.

Point #4
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Here’s where I’ll know if you were paying attention…

Point #5
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I knew you’d be amazing at this. Keep heading straight, it’s time to meet the Boston Common ducks.

Point #6
Make Way for the Ducklings

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Statue
https://www.boston-discovery-guide.com/make-way-for-ducklings.html

On your left, you’ll see statues representing a family of ducks making their way through Boston Common, and while it might seem a little random, it’s actually quite fitting, if you happen to love children’s books. Robert McCloskey wrote and illustrated a children’s book called, ‘Make Way for Ducklings”. Sure, I could tell you all about the book, and the nail-biting journey this family of ducks took, but where’s the fun in that? Do they all make it home together? Are there tragic losses on the way? I know your curiosity to find out what happens might make it hard to concentrate on the rest of the tour and that’s totally understandable. For now, try to put your worries to rest while we continue to explore this beautiful park! And who knows, maybe the visitor center we’ll pass by later will have a copy of the book. Keep going straight and I’ll let you know when to turn.

Point #7
Directions

13 Arlington St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Don’t turn here! It’ll be after the pond.

Point #8
Directions

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Speaking of the pond, soon you’re going to get quite the picturesque view of it.

Point #9
Directions

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Isn’t it beautiful

Point #10
Directions

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

The next path you see is where we’ll turn left.

Point #11
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Yep, this is the one you want to turn left on so I can show you the bench from the iconic American movie “Good Will Hunting'' where Robin Williams and Matt Damon sat. While the mathematical genius janitor is a fictional character, China has it’s real-life equivalent. In 2016 a 33-year old, Yu Jianchun (Ji-an-chun), a parcel delivery man, with no college degree, created an alternative proof for verifying Carmichael numbers. Don’t ask. I looked that up and read all about what a Carmichael number is and I still don’t understand, but I guess what he did is pretty impressive. The first verified proof was written in the late 1990’s by a group of academics, and since then there have been variations created, but all follow the same base theory. Yu, however, has created a completely different proof, which is pretty mind blowing to mathematicians as You did it without any specific math education. Personally, I think anyone who can even explain how Carmichael numbers work is a genius. Maybe China should think about building Yu his own bench. Just a thought. When this path veers to the left, follow it, and maybe you can sit on Will Hunting's bench while I tell you a little more about it.

Point #12
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Don’t forget to turn left here!

Point #13
Good Will Hunting Bench

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Famous Movie Set Bench
https://onlocationtours.com/locations/good-will-hunting-filming-locations/

I know, it looks like an ordinary bench, but now that you know who’s famous back end sat here, it takes on a whole new look. Robin Williams and Matt Damon sat here when they shot one of their most famous scenes in 1997’s “Good Will Hunting”. Sean Maguire (played by Williams) is a therapist talking to his patient, Will Hunting (played by Damon), who is ‘wicked smart’. They sat here as they recorded one of the most beautiful scenes of the film. Looking out over the water, Williams turns to Damon, sitting to his left, as his character is brutally honest as he says … actually, like the ducklings, “I don’t want to ruin it by telling you too much”. If you’ve seen the movie, you’ll know exactly what part I’m talking about, if you haven’t – I highly recommend watching it. But I will tell you one of my favorite lines from the scene is when Williams says, “Real loss is only possible when you love something more than you love yourself.” If you’re curious about the statue you see in the background, hold on to that, we’ll be seeing it up close and personal later in our tour! When you’re ready to continue, keep going on this path and take a left up ahead. This will keep us on the path that runs closest to the pond.

Point #14
Directions

Arlington St & Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Again, nice job on paying attention. Enjoy the view of the pond as we get ready to cross over the bridge. Don’t worry, we’ll come to this side before the tour is over. I still need to show you the statue I promised to tell you about.

Point #15
Directions

13 Arlington St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Up ahead, on your right, you’ll see some steps. Take those and let’s head across the bridge.

Point #16
Directions

13 Arlington St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

You got this!

Point #17
Directions

13 Arlington St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Almost there

Point #18
Directions

13 Arlington St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Let’s make our way across the bridge, leaving - for now - the Public Garden and crossing over to the Boston Common!

Point #19
Directions

13 Arlington St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

We’re going to stay on this path for a little while, which gives me the perfect chance to tell you a little bit about how this all came to be. While our tour may have started in the Public Garden, it was Boston Common that was created first, in 1634, which also made it America’s first public park. It was located in the center of town and built to serve a practical use, as the walkways made it easier for crosstown travel. It was also used for cattle grazing. It wasn’t until a century later, in 1824, the Public Garden side was created, as the city also wanted a park where people could meander through beautifully landscaped pathways and escape the hustle and bustle of a busy life, even if just for a moment. My favorite part of this park is how different it can look throughout the different seasons. The blossoms in the spring, gorgeous flower gardens in the summer, the bright colors of the leaves as they change in the fall, and even in the bitter cold winter there is a beauty here as the snow stretches out before you, undisturbed, quiet, like the peaceful kind of quiet that comes on those cold winter days…..but that would also mean you don’t mind feeling like you’re frozen to the bone and the cold air seems to pierce your lungs with every breath, and your cheeks burn with a sharp sting that comes with below freezing temperatures, then by all means, this would be the perfect place for a long, freezing, you-must-be-crazy, winter stroll. And you can tell me all about it when you get home as I’ll be inside, with a warm blanket and a mug of hot cocoa in my hands.

Point #20
Edward Everett Hale

16 Charles St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Statue
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Everett_Hale

May I introduce you to Edward Everett Hale, or at least the statue portraying him. Erected in 1913, this statue honors the life of this American author, historian, and Unitarian minister. One of his best known writings was “The Man Without a Country '', which he wrote in support of the union during the Civil War. He also wrote a sequel, “Philip Nolan’s Friends,” which Hale is quoted as saying, ‘To write the story I had to make as careful a study as I could of the history of the acquisition of Louisiana by the United States.” I imagine that kind of careful attention to detail, to make sure he was as accurate as possible in his writing, took many, many hours in the 1860’s. If only Wikipedia existed back then. Sorry Hale, you were just a few hundred years too early. One of my more favorites of his quotes is, “I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.” Well, said Hale. Definitely words to live by. Now straight ahead is another friend of Boston’s, let’s go say hi.

Point #21
John Paul II Placard

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Placard
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_John_Paul_II_Memorial_(Boston)

Here you will see the memorial placard of Pope John Paull II, sometimes called Papal Mass Plaque, which commemorates the first mass he celebrated in the United States, on October 1, 1979, right here at Boston Common. As the Pope stood in front of the people of Boston he said, “May God’s peace descend on this city of Boston, and bring joy to every conscience, and joy to every heart.” If you know any Bostonian’s, you know one thing, they are loyal and have certainly felt joy in their hearts living in this amazing city. Makes you want to move here, right?? Me too. From here, keep going straight and I'll let you know when it’s time to turn left.

Point #22
Directions

45 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Don’t turn yet.

Point #23
Directions

45 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Turn left here!!! Then head down the path to our next stop!

Point #24
Directions

45 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I’m going to give you important instructions up ahead, so make sure you’re listening!

Point #25
Soldiers & Sailors Memorial

Boston Common Frog Pond, 38 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Memorial
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldiers_and_Sailors_Monument_(Boston)

Before I tell you about this memorial, I want to give you directions to find the right path we’re taking next. That way you can wander around the Soldiers and Sailors Monument for however long you want and still end up going down the correct path when you’re done. If you turn left, the first path has a rock in front of it dedicated to the nurses in the armed forces. That’s the path we’ll take next. But first, let me tell you about the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument. It was originally known as the Army and Navy Monument, dedicated in 1877. At that time there were four bronze statues on its corner pedestals, representing a soldier, sailor, peace, and history. Unfortunately the statues had to be removed to prevent further deterioration. The monument’s base has four bronze plaques depicting war-related scenes. The first tablet is titled The Departure for the War, and depicts a regiment marching by the Massachusetts State House. The second depicts the medical care on the battlefield and is titled The Sanitary Commission. The third is of Union sailors in a war between a Federal man-of-war and a Confederate ironclad, which as you can see, is a steam propelled warship, protected by steel armor plates. The fourth tablet, entitled The Return from the War, shows a regiment of veterans marching by the State House to present their battle flags to Governor John Albion Andrew. If you look above the tablets, at the base of the column, are four carved granite figures representing the northern, southern, eastern and western areas of the reunited nation. You can also see images of two men, any guesses on who they are? If you guessed Edgar Allan Poe and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, then well done. Atop the monument’s column is a bronze statue, symbolizing America. She is crowned by thirteen stars (because at the time there were only 13 states), with a united states flag in her left hand, a sword and laurel wreaths in her right. When you’re facing the west side of the monument, you’ll see the dedication which reads, “To the men of Boston who died for their country, on land and sea, in the war which kept the Union whole, destroyed slavery and maintained the Constitution. The grateful city has built this monument that their example may speak to coming generations.” Now If you don’t remember which path to take, in front of one path you’ll see a large rock with a plaque dedicated to the memory of the nurses of the armed forces. That’s the one we are taking.

Point #26
Directions

45 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I knew you’d come down the right path! Keep heading straight!

Point #27
Boston Common Carousel

45 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Carousel
https://www.bostoncentral.com/activities/parks/p2055.php

Stop here for one quick second so I can give you directions to the next path we’ll take. Instead of going left, if you turn right and take about three steps, you’ll see a path on your right. Turn down that one, almost like we’re walking back the general direction we came from. For those of you who are Carousel lovers, you’ll get how cool it is that this particular Carousel, made in 1947, came from the famous Allan Herschell Company. Herschell’s company started in 1915 and was most famous for it’s detailed hand-carved wooden carousels. Before the company was sold, it had made over 3000 of these special carousels. The only thing I’ve ever tried to hand-carve was an arrow from a stick I found outside. I’ll just say this, about the only thing that arrow would have been able to penetrate was a balloon, and that’s even doubtful. When you’re done here, head back to the path I showed you in the beginning and we’ll make our way to the next stop!

Point #28
Boston Common Frog Pond

45 Beacon St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Pond
https://bostonfrogpond.com/

I knew you’d get it right again! I love touring with brilliant people. On your left is the Frog Pond, and while we’re not actually going to walk around it (but feel free to if you want, just make sure you come back to the same spot where you left) I still wanted to at least tell you what it started as and what it is today. The original ponds on Boston Common were used for grazing cattle, but by the late 1800’s, when it was transformed into a public park, these ponds became swimming holes, and in the 1970’s, spray pools, and then an ice rink in 1996. Today the Frog Pond is a spray and splash pool in the summer, and an ice skating rink in the winter. And while it still bears the name, ‘Frog Pond’, the only animals you’ll see frolicking around and searching for food crumbs left behind, are the squirrels.

Point #29
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

You’re doing great, keep heading straight!

Point #30
The Great Elm

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Landmark
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Elm_(Boston)

I know this will be the third time I’ve had to give you directional instructions, but with so many paths to take, I want to make sure you take the right one and not the one that leads to a giant pit full of spitting cobras! Anyway, I’m doing all I can to make sure you stick with me on this tour. Up ahead you will see that the path becomes an intersection in multiple directions. Just keep going straight through the intersection of paths, and then you’ll take a left on the first path you come to. I’ll give you a heads up, to make sure I’ve still got you. For now, look at this beauty on your right. It’s clear to see why it’s called the Great Elm. Doh!! Nowww I remember…this is where the tree USED to be! But that just goes to show how much Bostonians loved their Great Elm. It doesn’t matter that the tree was removed over 100 years ago - February 15th, 1876 to be exact. It continues to live on in their hearts. And on a plaque. And on this tour. Before February 15, 1876 the most majestic Elm tree dug its roots deep in the ground you see before you. It was known as the Great Elm, and is often referred to as Boston’s Oldest Inhabitant. In the earliest years, as the town was just beginning to take root, (see what I did there?) the Great Elm was also the Great Executor, yep, the elm was used for public executions. What one person calls horrific to watch, others call it a Monday afternoon with the family. To each their own. The tree eventually became the center point in town, obviously, and once they stopped using it for public executions, it was known as the greatest climbing tree you could ever hope for. Once the civil war began, this area was used for military training, yet even with the sounds of yelling commanders, the clashing of bayonets, and boots constantly marching, the beauty and popularity of the tree still had its pull. Enough so that the most elite Bostonians, including John Hancock’s uncle, built their large homes as close to the tree as possible. After the war ended and peace began, the number of people wanting to build their homes near the center of town increased, which in turn improved the Common’s condition, which, yep, even more so increased the popularity of the area, and so on. The Boston Common was well on its way to becoming the beautiful recreational park you see today. Through all of these transitions, the Great Elm stood as a silent witness to the growing city of Boston. Sadly, popularity comes with a price. Due to the age and overuse of the Great Elm, its once strong limbs weakened until it’s inevitable demise. The city worked to protect it, even building a fence around the tree in hopes to deter anyone from climbing it. In 1860 a major storm severely damaged the tree, and on February 15, 1876, another major storm with heavy winds, toppled Boston’s Great Elm. Even now, more than 100 years later, people are drawn to this spot, some Bostonian’s say they can feel the presence that the Great Elm left behind. While it’s a stark contrast to what once stood tall and majestic, there is a small plaque to celebrate the legacy and importance the Great Elm Tree had to the Boston Common. Rest in Peace, Great Elm Tree, rest in peace. When you’ve said your goodbyes to the elm tree’s spirit, continue heading straight on the path, but listen closely for me to tell you when to turn left.

Point #31
Directions

139 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

LEFT!

Point #32
Directions

139 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Once again, marvelous job on following directions. Simply marvelous. Stay straight on this path.

Point #33
Directions

Brewer Fountain, Tremont St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

While we make our way to the next stop, I’ll share some random, but interesting, facts about Boston. Let’s see how many, if any, you already knew. While we ultimately won the Revolutionary war, obviously, the Brits got the last word, or should I say name? Yep, many of Boston’s earliest settlers were from Boston, England, and decided to keep that name for this city. Well played, England. Well played. Also, the first American lighthouse was built in Boston Harbor in 1716 and Boston was also the first American city to have a chocolate factory. “Happy Hour” is against the law in Boston, as post-work drink deals were banned in 1984. So does that mean I get a pre-work drink deal to start the work day with a drink, rather than ending it? I don’t typically start drinking before work, but if it’s ok with Boston, it’s ok with me. And seeing as Boston is named after a city in England, it makes sense. Really, Boston is sounding better and better. Another interesting, but mind-boggling fact – on January 15th, 1919, a storage tank holding more than 2 million gallons of molasses burst, sending a wave of hot, syrupy substance through the North End of Boston. The part that’s mind-boggling to me is it killed 21 people and injured more than 100 others. Um…isn’t molasses known for how slow it moves? Seriously, there’s even a phrase about it, “slow as molasses' '. Like I said, mind-boggling that they couldn’t just get out of the way. Maybe it was because of all the early morning drinking. Who knows. While you’re thinking about that, keep heading straight and when this path dead ends, take a left and then you’re very next right!

Point #34
Directions

5 Park St Pl, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Take a left here, and then take a right. I know, this is all very exciting.

Point #35
Robert Gould Shaw & the 54th

5 Park St Pl, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Memorial
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Gould_Shaw

I love the look of this memorial, the way it’s engulfed in a box shape, giving depth to the soldiers with Colonel Robert Gould Shaw out in front, leading his men to fight in the South. It was on May 28th, 1863, that the 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry marched down Beacon Street to fight for the North. At some point this memorial, being over 100 years old and weather worn, will be removed to an offsite location for restoration. While this is going on, a new, more solid concrete foundation will be built. Clearly the city means business when they’re willing to invest $2.8 million dollars to restore one of their memorials. Can’t wait to see it when they’re done!! Keep heading straight and take a right down the path opposite the flight of stairs.

Point #36
Directions

5 Park St Pl, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

If some of you are wondering why I’m not going into a lot of detail about the Freedom Trail, when we’re right on top of it, that’s because UCPlaces has a tour, actually two tours, totally dedicated to the Freedom Trail. Because it can be a long tour to do all at once, especially if someone is short on time, we created a Freedom Trail North and a Freedom Trail South tour. They are awesome and I highly recommend taking both if you can. Keep heading straight!

Point #37
Directions

Brewer Fountain, Tremont St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

You’re almost there!

Point #38
Brewer Fountain

139 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Fountain
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewer_Fountain

As we are at another circular spot on our tour, I think you’re probably a pro at what’s coming next. That’s right, a quick direction so you can wander around the fountain as long as you want and know what path to take on our way out. When you get to the other side of the fountain, you’ll see three paths, if you take the one going left, you’ll exit the park, the one on the right, you’ll head into the park on a path that will take you back to Robert Gould Shaw, and while we do love the 54th Regiment, I think for now we should take the path in the middle, the one that goes straight ahead so I can show you more awesome parts of Boston Common. But first, the Brewer Fountain. Knowing that Boston is home to several nationally-known brewers, like Samuel Adams and Harboon, it was only natural that this great city became the hub for the developing craft beer revolution in the 1980’s. So you can see why the first time I heard of Brewer Fountain, I thought it must be some REALLY good beer if it’s flowing from a fountain, and added yet another reason I want to live here! But alas, it’s named, more appropriately so, after the gifter of the fountain, Gardner Brewer. Because of Brewer’s love for Boston, he had the fountain cast in Paris and brought it over as a gift to the city. It was June 3, 1868, when water, not beer – which I still think is a great idea - first began flowing from this beautiful structure. This fountain is one of several casts of the original, which was featured at the 1855 Paris World Fair. At least 16 other copies exist around the world, with the figures of Neptune, Amphitrite (Neptune’s wife), and Acis and Galatea, who are another couple from Greek Mythology. Whether you’re lucky enough to see the fountain running or not, what an incredible piece of art to behold. I wonder what it would take to get a replica fountain where I live. Hmmmm. I can’t decide if I should move here or just replicate Boston where I live. Tough call. Remember to head straight on the next path!

Point #39
Directions

139 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Great job! Now at the next path intersection, take a left, like you’re going out to the street. We aren’t leaving the park, just making a small detour.

Point #40
Directions

139 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

LEFT!

Point #41
Directions

139 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Keep heading straight and you’ll come to another circular area, with the Boston Common Visitor Center on your right. When this path ends, turn right, as if you’re going to go into the store, and I’ll give you directions there on which path we’ll take next.

Point #42
Boston Common Visitor Center

151 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02111, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Visitor Center
https://www.bostonusa.com/plan-your-trip/additional-resources/visitor-information-centers/

There’s a path that makes a sharp right and heads down the other side of the visitor center – we don’t want that one! We want the next path you’d come to going around the circle, it’s right after you pass the Industry statue. In the meantime, if you want to grab a souvenir or take a quick bathroom break, this is the place to do it. When you’re done, I’ll meet you down the path on the way to our next stop!

Point #43
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I never doubted you for a minute. I knew you’d know where to go. Keep heading straight and I’ll let you know when to turn next.

Point #44
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Doing great!

Point #45
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Take your next left.

Point #46
Boston Massacre Memorial

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Memorial
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Massacre_Monument

Turn left! Before I tell you about this very controversial memorial, I want to tell you that when we’re done here, head back out the way we came and take a left, so we’re heading back down the path we were on. So, what makes this memorial so different from any other memorial built to remember an event of the past? Well, most memorials usually tend to be accurate in what they represent, I mean they’re here to tell a historical story, right? We can trust that the stories we hear and clearly memorialize, would be told with honest, factual integrity, with no room for political gain, right? That’s how I would assume it would be. Unfortunately, politics are politics, whether over 200 years ago or 2 hours ago, it simply comes down to who’s story gets to be told the loudest. There were a lot of objections to the erecting of this monument as many members of the Massachusetts Historical Society strongly opposed it, and rightly so. It’s a sad story, the Boston Massacre, for more reasons than one. The title of this memorial is telling in and of itself. One wouldn’t normally use the word ‘massacre’ when you’re talking about the death of five people. It would seem to be a little dramatic, but if you’re trying to create drama to sway emotions of the people, then massacre is the perfect word to use, whether it’s accurate or not. If you’d rather believe the story taught in schools, and the story told in the carved pictured before you, in that the British soldiers attacked and killed innocent colonists, then this will be a stop on our tour you’ll want to skip. If you’d rather hear the truth, from the mouths of witnesses who testified in the trial, then get ready to go back in time while I tell you the facts about what happened that fateful night in 1770. It was early evening, March 5th, 1770, when a young man named Edward Garrick insulted the soldier on duty at the Customs House. The soldier in return hit Garrick in the ear with the butt of his bayonet. If only it would have stopped there. Garrick walked away but came back with a group of around 40angry men yelling insults and screaming threats towards the soldier. These men were led by Crispus Attucks, a large intimidating sailor, carrying a big stick and yelling to the men following him. James Bailey, a local colonist and no friend to the soldiers, recounted under oath what he heard Attucks yelling to his fellow sailors, “Do not be afraid of them, they dare not fire, kill them! Kill them! Knock them over!” As Attucks and his men began ascending on the square, a citizen worried about what would ensue, rang the meeting house bell, which normally is rung as a call for fire, but this time it was for a situation that was getting all fired up. Quickly civilians began running to the square. It should be mentioned that even on a good day the soldiers and sailors were not friendly toward one another and often small incidents would break out between them. So it’s not surprising many of the men who came running came because of their negative feelings towards the soldiers and were ready to support, if not join in the confrontation. As the crowd began growing, Captain Preston arrived with more soldiers, pushing through the crowd to bring peace and order and hopefully disperse the crowd with no casualties. I imagine that could have come across as hostile, fueling an already tense situation. Preston’s hopes of a peaceful ending, with only eight soldiers, outnumbered three to one and violent tension filling the air, was about to come to an end. James Bailey’s eye-witness account says he saw twenty or thirty sailors and civilians surround the sentry, pelting the British soldiers with chunks of ice the size as a man’s fist, certainly big enough that a hit to the head could be fatal. If they weren’t throwing ice they threw sticks, rocks, and whatever else they could find. Bailey stated that Attucks, “had hardiness enough to fall in upon them (the soldiers) and with one hand took hold of a bayonet, and with the other knocked the man down”. Witness testimony says that Private Hugh Montgomery was the first to fire a shot. According to Bailey’s testimony, he states he saw a man with a club knock Montgomery down before he ever fired his gun and was hit hard enough that when he fell his gun flew out of his hand. At this point you can see why Montgomery felt his life was in danger, and he shot his gun out of self-defense. After that first shot, six seconds elapsed before all hell broke loose and a round of shots were fired. As the crowd began to scatter in a panic, more men, including John Adams, came running to assist in bringing this fatal confrontation to an end. When the dust settled, eleven men were lying on the ground, four of them dead, including Crispus Attucks, a fifth man died later from his wounds. . Captain Preston assembled his men and marched them away in silence. But the citizens wanted revenge and the threat of more violence loomed in the air, so additional British soldiers arrived to reestablish order and avoid further bloodshed. At this point Massachusetts Governor Thomas Hutchinson came to the scene and from the second story balcony of the Town House he told the crowd that Preston and his men would be tried for murder. Just three weeks after the Boston Massacre, Paul Revere published “The Bloody Massacre in King-Street” which was probably the most effective piece of war propaganda in American history, regardless of the fact that it was inaccurate and the picture drawn to illustrate what happened, which you can see here on the memorial, is completely false. Unfortunately, that’s the world of politics.

Point #47
Parkman Bandstand

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Bandstand
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkman_Bandstand

Our next stop, if you want to check it out, will be the Parkman Bandstand. If you want to see it, then take a right and follow the path, just make sure to come back this same way, turning right so you can continue down the path. If you’d rather keep going, no worries, I’ll tell you about it anyway. The bandstand is a beautiful pavilion constructed in honor of George F. Parkman and the $5 million donation he had willed for the care of not just the Boston Common, but for other parks around the city. Built in 1912, and restored in 1966, it has been used for concerts, weddings, rallies, and speeches. In 2007 a Presidential Primary rally was held where Barack Obama gave a speech from the bandstand. But my favorite time to visit is when the park is quiet, the sun is shining with a gentle breeze in the air, and I can sit with a book and simply take in the historical beauty around me. Don’t forget, if you happened to come down the path to see the bandstand, make sure you go back up the path you came on and take a right to continue on our tour.

Point #48
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

When I first began researching Boston Common, I had no idea how much I would learn. I thought I knew a lot about Boston, but it turns out, I didn’t know beans about Boston. I know a pun is less funny when it’s explained, but it was way too cheesy to not throw out there. There’s an American phrase, “you don’t know beans” that means you don’t know anything about something. It was first put in print in a poem published in 1855 that said: "When our recent Tutor is heard to speak, This truth one certainly gleans, Whatever he knows of Euclid and Greek, In Latin he don't know beans." In the early 1800’s beans were small and worthless, so to use it in reference to someone’s knowledge about a subject, would infer they don’t know anything. Add to that ,the fact that in 1620, Boston added molasses to their local baked bean recipes, creating Boston Baked Beans, and the rest is history. Once you’ve tasted beans this way, baked beans will never be the same. Now – with all that information, you can see how witty my pun was when I said, I didn’t know beans about Boston.

Point #49
Central Burying Ground

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Cemetery
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Burying_Ground,_Boston

The cemetery, coming up on your left, known as Central, was established in 1756, to avoid overcrowding at some of the more desired cemeteries in Boston. Because you know once you’re dead your popularity on the other side depends on what cemetary you’re coming from. I get wanting to be buried close to loved ones that have passed away, but if it’s solely because you think you’ll be more important buried in one cemetary over another…that just doesn’t make sense, whatever cemetary it is, people are dying to get in there. Regardless, at the time Bostonians considered this cemetery the least desirable because it was farthest away from the center of town. Some of the first to be buried here were British soldiers, foreigners who died while in Boston, some American patriots from the battle of Bunker Hill and the Boston Tea Party, the painter Gilbert Stuart, who painted the famous portraits of George and Martha Washington, and a composer, William Billings. If you ask me, that sounds like an awesome group to party with on the other side – you’ve got the rebels, foreigners with cool accents, some patriots who kept some of the tea from being thrown overboard for just this sort of occasion, we’ve got a composer to entertain us, and a painter to paint it all – what more could you want?? Clearly, all the cool kids were buried at Central. Take a right on the path in front of you, because we’re going to cross over Charles street, which is the road that runs right through the middle of Boston Common.

Point #50
Directoins

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Turn right!

Point #51
Directions

111 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Enter description here...

Point #52
Directions

97 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Enter description here...

Point #53
Directions

95 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Now take this path back into the park and then stay to the left when it splits.

Point #54
Directions

199 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Left!!

Point #55
Wendell Phillips Statue

199 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Statue
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wendell_Phillips

Here is the statue of Wendall Phillips, dedicated July 4, 1915. Phillip was the mayor’s son and living out his life as a lawyer, until he heard a speech that changed the course of his life, and the course of history. When Wendall Phillips heard the speech given in 1835 by William Garrison, one of the most radical opponents of slavery, he decided to leave his legal practice to support the abolitionist cause. Phillips and Garrison teamed up in their fight to end slavery and worked closely together, traveling and speaking at events to gain support. In 1837 he gave his own speech at Faneuil Hall, which became one of the three most important speeches in American history, condemning the assassination of Elijah Lovejoy, an abolitionist minister and publisher. Because of Phillip’s passion and mesmerizing way of connecting with those who listened to him, he quickly became known as “The Abolitionist’s Golden Trumpet”. The abolitionist movement was gaining ground by 1840 and in 1865 Phillips took over as president of the American Anti-Slavery Society, following Garrison’s resignation. But fighting for the abolitionist’s cause wasn’t the only thing Phillips fought for. During the Civil War he advocated for humane treatment of prisoners and was an early advocate of women’s rights. He was truly a man of honor and passionate about equality. He spent the remainder of his life as a crusader for temperance, women’s rights, and universal suffrage. One of his most famous quotes was, “Whether in chains or in laurels, liberty knows nothing but victories”. Let’s keep following the path to the next statue.

Point #56
Thomas Cass

93 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Thomas Cass
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Cass_(colonel)

Thomas Cass was Irish born and moved to Boston as a young child. His father began working and providing for the family, while Thomas was thrown into the school system, where the kids weren’t too fond of him and his foreign accent. But he was determined as a child to make Boston his home, and that passion followed him into adulthood. Over the years he made a name for himself as a savvy and successful businessman, but when the call came to fight against the Confederate’s, he didn’t hesitate. He enlisted with the local militia and quickly rose to the rank of captain. Cass began recruiting Irishmen, eager to prove that he and his fellow boys were as patriotic and willing to fight for their new country as any Yankee. In 1861, the time came for them to prove their patriotism. They were officially mustered into the Federal army and would be heading to set up camp near Arlington, Virginia as part of the capital’s defense forces. Cass was named colonel and commander of the Ninth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry regiment, and as he led his men through the streets of Boston, throngs of people, Irish and Yankee, Catholic and protestant alike, turned out to cheer the regiment on. When they passed the State House, Cass accepted its regimental colors – a green Irish banner bearing the gilded words, “Gentle when stroked, fierce when provoked.” Cass more than proved his patriotism as he fought fiercely for his country until the day he died, July 12th, 1862. A few years after his death a statue was erected in his honor. While that was a great gesture, it didn’t take away from the fact it pretty much sucked. Thankfully surviving veterans of his regiment weren’t going to put up with it and demanded a new statue be made to honor their fallen hero. The Society of the Ninth Regiment agreed and in 1897 worked to raise the funds needed to tear down the old statue and commission the very talented sculptor, Richard E. Brooks, to craft the striking bronze statue you see before you. Brooks perfectly captured the visage and commanding presence of colonel Thomas Cass and with its unveiling on September 22, 1899, Brooks received the highest praise by being presented with a prestigious award for creating something worthy to honor a hero – a Boston Irish and American hero.

Point #57
Tadeusz Kościuszko

215 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Statue
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tadeusz_Ko%C5%9Bciuszko

You are now looking at the Tadeusz Kościuszko statue, named after Andrzej Tadeusz Bonawentura Kościuszko. Do NOT make me try to pronounce that again. Tadeusz was born in Poland sometime in February of 1746- his exact birth date to this day is unknown. He had a very adventurous life having worked as a statesman, military engineer, and as Supreme Commander of the Polish National Armed Forces. He fought during the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth’s struggles, with the United States during the American Revolutionary War, and started the Kościuszko Uprising- an attempt to liberate the Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth from Russia’s influence. The memorial itself was cast in 1927 to commemorate Kościuszko and all that he did. To this day he is viewed as a national hero in Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, and in the United States. Keep heading straight.

Point #58
Charles Sumner Statue

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Statue
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Sumner

Charles Sumner was born on January 6, 1811 in the lovely state of Massachusetts. At a young age he was already deemed by peers and teachers to be destined for success, meaning he was the kid that you wanted to be friends with. Sumner was different in the fact that he loved to study and expand his mind- weird, right? As an adult he was one of few senators to fight for abolition during the Civil War. As if he wasn’t already doing enough, Sumner went on to become an academic lawyer and continued to fight for equal rights all the way up until his death in 1874. After his death, it was decided that a statue would be created to commemorate Sumner and all that he did. The Boston Art Committee decided to spice things up by allowing community members to submit their own design ideas. Originally they decided on an anonymous submission that had Sumner sitting down with a book in hand, staring thoughtfully off into the distance. It began to go underway until a secret came out- the submission was designed by…a WOMAN! Oh, humanity! During the late 1800’s it was considered taboo for a woman to design or sculpt, and it was for this reason, and this reason alone, that a new design was chosen. The new design was created by a sculptor named Thomas Ball and it is his statue that you see here today. It was soon discovered that the creator of the first design was a woman named Anne Whitney. Luckily, people came around to their senses and decided to build her statue of Sumner in 1902 which can still be found sitting right outside of Harvard Yard’s Johnston Gate today. Would you care to guess if we’re going to turn right or left on the next path? If you guessed Right, you ARE right!

Point #59
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Turn Right!

Point #60
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Take your next Left! Aren’t directions so fun and never ever get old??

Point #61
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Annnnd left.

Point #62
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Left again! Stay on this path and it will eventually curve to your right, that’s where I’ll show you the Garden of Remembrance 9/11 Memorial.

Point #63
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Almost there...

Point #64
Garden of Remembrance 9/11

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Memorial
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Public_Garden_9/11_Memorial

We made it. Boston had the mayor, parks department, Boston public garden, a senator, and the United States Department of Agriculture all working together to start a fund to memorialize the victims of September 11, 2001 from Massachusetts and New England, a remembrance space for 250 families. With so many people working and organizations working together, there were more than a few ideas of where the best spot would be for those wanting to pay their respects. Some thought it would be good to place it in one of the new parks being created as part of the Big Dig. I won’t even bother going into detail about the nightmares involved in that craziness. Thankfully they ultimately decided this spot had a quality that, according to the director, Linda Plazonja, would ensure a “reverence of space.” This site is not only in America’s first public botanic garden, a National Historic Landmark, central to the city, historic, quiet, and guaranteed to be maintained throughout time - clearly, they couldn’t have picked a better spot in all of Boston. With so many loved Boston icons located in the adjacent Boston Common, and the quiet beauty of the gardens, this is a place where nearly every family member and Bostonian has some positive connection, where they can pay their respects to someone they love, in a place they love. When you’re done here keep heading straight. Our next turn we’ll take will be to the right.

Point #65
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

After this right, maybe just for kicks we’ll throw in a left.

Point #66
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Yep, left it is. In fact, I think we should give the right turns a break and just do left turns for a bit.

Point #67
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

When you come to a deadend, take a left. In the meantime, I have a riddle for you to figure out while we’re walking. Are you ready for it? Listen carefully... You’re riding a horse, a hungry lion is chasing you, and all you have is a giraffe running next to you, what do you do?

Point #68
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I’ll give you a second more to think about it...

Point #69
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Ok, what do you do if you’re riding a horse, a hungry lion is chasing you, and all you have is a giraffe running next to you? You get your drunk butt off the carousel and let the kids have a turn. Obviously.

Point #70
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Take a left up ahead.

Point #71
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Yep, left here and take your second left

Point #72
Directions

13 Arlington St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Almost there

Point #73
Directions

13 Arlington St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

left!

Point #74
George Washington Statue

13 Arlington St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Statue
http://lostnewengland.com/2016/02/george-washington-statue-public-garden-boston/

This will not surprise you one bit, I’m going to give you a quick direction on what path we’re taking when you’re done here. As there are a lot of different paths around the statue to take, I want you to take the path directly on the other side of the statue, as if the statue wasn’t here and you simply walked a straight line. Ahh, George, it’s always good to see you. This monument is what many people consider to be one of Boston’s finest sculptures, as I am sure you can see why. You may find yourself wondering, “now who might this fine fellow be?” The answer to that is the one and only, George Washington. But, the REAL question you should be asking yourself is “did he chop down the cherry tree?” This statue shows George Washington as an adult with some rather distinguishable features. If you look close, you can see a focused, confident look in both his face and posture. You can find these features in the horse too with how its ears point straight ahead. On a bit of a side note… If you are a fan of staring contests like me, George Washington here is hard competition- he has yet to lose a single contest! This statue of George Washington is the largest one in the park, reaching a height of 22 feet- 38 if you include the pedestal. Amazingly, this giant bronze creation was funded entirely by donations and a single fair held in 1859. Within four years of getting all the money needed, the statue was complete, though the casting of this piece would not be done until years later due to the Civil War.

Point #75
Directions

Arlington St & Marlborough St, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

I can see why Boston loves that statue. Keep going straight, our next stop is about something most people wouldn’t necessarily think, “You know what we need? We need a monument about ---” Come on...you didn’t think I would tell you yet did you? You’ve got to get a little closer for that info. Maybe see if you can guess what it is before we get there.

Point #76
Directions

Unnamed Road, Boston, MA 02116, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Walk around to the other side of this oval and keep heading straight.

Point #77
Directions

94 MA-2, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Just a little farther and I’ll tell you about this not so common monument.

Point #78
Ether Monument

94 MA-2, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Monument
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ether_Monument

You were so patient. May I present the oldest statue in Boston Garden: the Ether monument. In 1868 this monument was built to commemorate the life changing extraordinary discovery that ether could be used as an anesthetic. Before this was discovered, any and all medical procedures- including surgeries- would be performed while the patient was still awake. So you can imagine the relief that everyone must have felt knowing they no longer had to watch their own operation. Yowzers! Makes me cringe thinking about those patients pre-1846. I’ve never appreciated an anesthesiologist more than I do now. It was September 30, 1846, when Bostonian dentist William Morton performed a painless tooth extraction after administering ether to a patient. When Boston surgeon Henry Jacob Bigelow heard about this, he arranged for a now-famous demonstration of ether on October 16, 1846 at the operating theatre of the Massachusetts General Hospital. At this demonstration John Collins Warren painlessly removed a tumour from the neck of a Mr. Edward Gilbert Abbott. News of this use of ether spread rapidly, not just here, but in other countries as well. You’re welcome world. The first recorded use of ether outside the USA was in London, England, At the top of the monument you can see a sculpture of a doctor holding a limp man on his knee with a cloth in his left hand. The figures are meant to enact the biblical story of the Good Samaritan providing aid to an injured stranger. In this case, the doctor would be considered the Good Samaritan and the man the stranger. The cloth is included to symbolize the administering of ether and the impactful role it had in bringing relief to patients and an end to suffering. For these reasons, this monument has also been referred to as The Good Samaritan. If you ever find yourself in need of a good samaritan, if they don’t have an ether soaked cloth, tell them to keep on walking, the good stuff is on it’s way. Although, doctors eventually found a different chemical they could use, other than Ether because of one unfortunate side effect. If the dose was administered incorrectly, it was fatal, but at least it was a painless death, right? Just looking for the silver lining here. I should probably keep looking. Ok, keep following the path in the direction that we have been going.

Point #79
Directions

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

We’re on our way to the last stop of this tour. I know, it makes me sad too! I’ve had such a great time with you. But hopefully, you’ll take more tours and we can hang out again soon!! In the meantime, stay on this path until it dead ends, and then take a left.

Point #80
Directions

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

We’re on our way to the last stop of this tour. I know, it makes me sad too! I’ve had such a great time with you. But hopefully, you’ll take more tours and we can hang out again soon!! In the meantime, stay on this path until it dead ends, and then take a left.

Point #81
Directions

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Our last left. It’s all straight forward from here.

Point #82
George Robert White Memorial

84 MA-28, Boston, MA 02108, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Memorial
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Robert_White

Welcome to the last stop of our tour, titled, “The Spirit of Giving,” This graceful figure was made to honor George Robert White- a man most well-known for his philanthropy. George White made a lot of money in his life through working with the pharmaceuticals business. In fact, he made so much money that when he passed away in 1922 he left FIVE MILLION DOLLARS to the city of Boston to create clinics and fuel the arts. In addition to this “small” contribution, he had a single request. He asked that fifty thousand dollars of his donation be used to build a memorial in his remembrance, and that is what you see before you today. The sculpture depicts an angelic figure sprinkling bread upon the water below. It is meant to symbolize George White sharing his wealth with the city, though it is also a great illustration of how to feed ducks. Who knew it could be both inspiring and educational! And that raps up our Boston Common tour. I hope you had a great time and maybe learned a few new facts that you didn’t know beans about before today. When you leave this memorial, if you turn left, that will lead you to Beacon St, just a block down from where we started, on Brimmer St, at Cheers. Wow, this was such a fun one! I hope you had a great time like I did. Please take some more UCPlaces tours so we can hang out again! Until then, so long and happy touring!