Points Of Interest

Point #1
Let's Begin

200 N 7th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Begin here
https://www.phillypolice.com/

Let’s get started! While this isn’t a race, we are going to cross Race street just up ahead, so I can show you Franklin Square. Head north on 7th Street. It’s a one-way street and you should be walking with the flow of traffic. By the way, that huge building ahead on your left is the Philadelphia Police Department Headquarters.

Point #2
Directions

200 N 6th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Glad you made it safely! Nothing like getting hit by a car to shorten a tour. Let’s follow this path to the center of Franklin Square, which is one of five original open-space parks planned when the city of Philadelphia was first being mapped out in 1682.

Point #3
Franklin Square

200 N 6th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Park
http://www.historicphiladelphia.org/franklin-square/what-to-see/

I need to give you some directions before we talk about Franklin Square. If you look to your right you’ll see a path leading away from the square, that’s the path you want to take when you’re done exploring and ready to move on. There, I feel much better knowing you won’t get lost and can find the right path to take when you’re ready. There was a time when Franklin Square had gone way down hill. I’m talking to a point where tourists and residents would avoid coming here at all. It was renamed “the city’s Skid Row” by locals. When construction of the Expressway began in the 1980’s it became even worse as homes were torn down, broken street lights scattered throughout the park and trees bulldozed over, left to rot next to the eroding historic fountain. As the park was now abandoned, it became an encampment site for the homeless and drug dealers. But never fear, money can fix everything in life, right? Especially when you’re talking about $5.5 million dollars for the sole purpose of restoring this historical square. It took a little time, but in the end it was worth every penny and every hour spent to bring the historical fountain back to life, add a golf course in the back, a new and improved playground and carousel, plus beautiful gardens. So enjoy the new and improved Franklin Square as long as you want, just remember to take the path I showed you earlier when you’re ready to continue.

Point #4
Living Flame Memorial

190N N 6th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Memorial
https://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/tag/living-flame-memorial/

Great job remembering which path to take! If you didn’t see it while you were exploring the square, I want to point out the Living Flame Memorial. Look to your left as you’re walking and you’ll see it. This memorial was erected to honor the city's fallen police officers and firefighters. I think monuments that honor people who spend their lives protecting and helping others are my favorite.

Point #5
Lightning Bolt

190N N 6th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Sculpture
https://www.associationforpublicart.org/artwork/bolt-of-lightning-a-memorial-to-benjamin-franklin/

We’re going to cross back over to the other side of Race Street, but I want you to see something before we do. If you look slightly behind you to your left you’ll see what one reporter describes as, “The ugliest piece of art in Philadelphia ''. Maybe beauty really is in the eye of the beholder because this is one...bizarre piece of art. For those who can’t tell what it is (don’t feel bad, it took me a minute the first time I saw it) you are looking at a representation of the lighting bolt hitting Benjamin Franklin’s key, tied to a kite. Seriously. Even a Port Authority commissioner from Pennnsylvania said, “It’s so damn ugly; it’ll probably take people’s minds off the higher tolls' '. Yeah, not so much. Not only do I have to see this every day on my commute, but now I have to pay even more to do so? And to add injury to insult, it’s a monument to honor Benjamin Franklin’s experiment using lightning for energy, which he never actually did. He wrote a paper with his theory about lightning and electricity but never put it to the test because he couldn’t get his conductor high enough to the clouds. While Franklin’s hypothesis was correct, it was the scientist in Paris that proved it successfully. Since I’m already destroying your vision of Franklin’s lightning experiment, I might as well get it all out now. The 1752 story of when the key he had attached to a kite was hit by lighting, has a slight problem with it. According to modern scientists, Benjamin Franklin would have been struck dead on the spot. Ouch. But hey, at least you have that shiny piece of...art to remind you of what never happened in the first place. With that, let’s cross over Race Street to your right and then cross over North 6th Street to the left. and I’ll tell you about the building you see up on your left.

Point #6
National Constitution Center

190N N 6th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Learning Center
https://constitutioncenter.org/

If you want to go inside and explore the National Constitution Center, take your time. Just make sure that when you’re done you come back to the sidewalk and continue down 6th street. That way you won’t miss anything awesome I might tell you up ahead. The National Constitution Center is one of the key points of interest on Independence Mall. This is where the Constitution was debated and ultimately signed on September 17th, 1787 and is now being held at the National Archives in Washington, DC. The idea of a permanent memorial to the Constitution was first proposed in 1887 in conjunction with the first centennial celebration of the Constitution’s signing. However, the idea didn’t gain traction for another 100 years. In 1987, President Reagan signed the law that called for the Center to be built near Independence Hall. President Clinton attended the Center’s groundbreaking on September 17, 2000, the 213th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution. The building itself was designed by the renowned architecture firm Pei Cobb Freed & Partners and is intended to portray themes in the Constitution itself. The front porch feels open and inviting, much like how the Constitution invites participation by the people. The windows and glass demonstrate transparency, which is key to democracy. And the diagonal shape of the building represents the Constitution’s ability to dynamically shape and be shaped by our society. The Center has hosted many important political events in its short history. For example, in 2008, it hosted a Democratic presidential primary debate between Senators Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama, a town hall meeting with Senator John McCain, and a pivotal speech on race by Senator Obama. The Center has also helped launch a local high school called Constitution High School, which is a history- and civics-themed magnet school in the Philadelphia School District.

Point #7
Directions

101 N Independence Mall W, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Keep heading straight. Then when you get to the next intersection, take the crosswalk over Arch Street and then turn left. As soon as you get to the red pathway with the cute trellis, turn right and keep walking. I’ll meet you just before the north entrance to the Independence Visitor Center...

Point #8
Independence Cafe

500 Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Cafe
https://pgavdestinations.com/portfolio/independence-cafe/

If you’re in the mood for a good cup of coffee or you want to fuel your energy with a bite to eat, then head over to the Independance Cafe you’ll see on your left, just make sure to come back this way so you can stay on track with the tour. If you’re more in the mood to indulge in something sinfully delicious, then you’ll want to head into Hershesy’s Kitchen on your right, just inside the Independence Visitor Center. Personally, I say do both. But that’s just me. Either way, meet me at the other outside entrance to the visitor center up ahead on your right when you’re done.

Point #9
Independence Visitor Center

6th St &, Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Visitor Center
https://www.phlvisitorcenter.com/

The Independence Visitor Center is the best place on Independence Mall to get information about visiting Philadelphia’s historical sites. It opened in 2001 and since then it has served as Philadelphia’s official visitor center. Nearly 2.5 million people visit each year from around the world, and the staff of the Center speaks lots of different languages and can help with free advice and trip-planning. If you are interested in seeing the inside of Independence Hall, going into the Visitor Center is a must. From March through December, the Center distributes Independence Hall tickets each day. The tickets are free, but the number of people allowed into the Hall is limited and sometimes the crowds are big. So be sure to plan ahead. You can get the tickets at the Ranger's Desk. The Visitor Center also has short movies, an interactive digital wall, and lots of maps and brochures. When you’re done inside, come back here and continue down this path until you get to the crosswalk taking you across Market street.

Point #10
Liberty Bell

6th St &, Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Liberty Bell
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberty_Bell

We’re at the corner of Market Street and 6th, does that ring a bell for anyone? It should, because the Liberty Bell is right across the street! When the coast is clear, cross the street and you’ll see the entrance to the Liberty Bell. Can you see the Bell if you don’t go inside? Good question. Yes, you can see it at the other end of this building surrounded by windows, HOWEVER, you can’t see the crack. And while a crack isn’t something anyone likes to see, even if it is fixing the kitchen sink, this crack is the exception. No offense plumbers, we all appreciate your hard work and the fact that there’s no problem you can’t crack, it’s just no Liberty Bell crack. If you’re going inside, I’ll meet you where you’ll exit at the other end of this building at the corner of 6th street and Chestnut. If you don’t have time to go in, don’t worry, I won’t let you miss out on some of the more important information you’d learn inside. Things like how the Liberty Bell came to be, how it cracked, what note did it play when it was rung, whose birthday did the Bell last ring for, and answer the burning question that keeps everyone up at night - is it or isn’t it a typo?? You may be wondering, “What is it that makes this Bell so special?” In short, it’s quite literally the symbol of liberty. Some say it’s a product of the revolution, but they would be incorrect. Not everything you know about this bell is factually correct, and much of this bell is shrouded in mystery. For instance did you know that the bell actually predates the revolution? It was ordered to be built in 1751 to commemorate and honor the 50th anniversary of William Penn’s Charter of Privileges, written in 1701. This charter was, at the time, Pennsylvania’s first Constitution. The charter discussed citizens' roles in making laws, Native American rights, and religious freedom. The bell stood for the freedoms and rights of people from all over the land and eventually became of symbol of the abolitionits to abolish slavery! Upon the bell is written the bible verse from Leviticus 25:10, "Proclaim Liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof," as a reminder of what each ring stood for. To answer the question that keeps you up at night - is there a typo - is no. The spelling of Pennsylvania on the bell shows only one N at the beginning and while the standard spelling today is with two N’s, it was commonly spelled in old documents and on old maps with one. In fact, Benjamin Franklin purposely spelled it different ways on each denomination bill. Sometimes with one N, sometimes with two, and even interchanging the y with an i. So while it might look awkward seeing Pennsylvania spelled with one N, it’s not technically a typo. Did you also know that we don’t definitively know when the bell first cracked? Historians believe it got its first fracture when it was tested back in 1752 when it arrived in the state of Pennsylvania, but this topic is widely debated by historians and scholars. We do, however, know when the last major crack occurred. This happened in February of 1846 on Presidents Day, when it rang in honor of George Washington’s Birthday. Hopefully these facts haven’t cracked you up too much, but here is one more fun one. Get this, the original name for the Liberty Bell wasn’t even the Liberty Bell. It used to be called the “State House Bell.” It was appropriately renamed in the 1830’s during the anti-slavery movement. Perhaps that’s one of the reasons it’s so special. Looking beyond what it is and instead looking at what it stood for. It is a symbol to all nations and people alike that freedom is key to happiness and no one should be denied. It’s cracked and not perfect, but neither is the history in which it was born. In a way, the bell is an embodiment of all of us.

Point #11
Independence Hall

111 S Independence Mall W, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Historic Hall
https://www.nps.gov/inde/planyourvisit/independencehall.htm

Ready to see Independence Hall?? Before you cross the street, I need you to listen to these instructions carefully!!! This is super important. Life and death are important. Ok, that might be a slight exaggeration, but it’s still important information in order to continue the tour. While we are going to definitely wander around and see all there is to see about the Independence Hall buildings, including the back side, don’t wander into the garden party just yet. We’re going to hit that later - you’re just going to have to trust me. So here’s the most important part, when you cross the street BEFORE you go do anything else, look to your right and you’ll see the Consulate General of Italy building, THAT corner is where you need to go when you’re done checking out Independence Hall. Get there and keep walking along Chestnut Street. I’ll find you. For now though, safely cross the street and head toward Independence Hall. There’s a big statue of George Washington out in front of it. Some people refer to Independence Hall as the birthplace of America, because our country’s two most important documents were debated and signed in this building. I’m talking about The Declaration of Independence and The U.S. Constitution. I wonder if the men building this great hall had any fathomable idea that over 40 years later the founding fathers would be standing within its walls, creating documents that would influence lawmakers around the world by its universal principles of freedom and democracy. Construction on the building started in 1732. It was built to be the Pennsylvania State House. There are five main areas where important meetings or gathering of influential people took place. There’s the Assembly Room, which some deem to be the most important as this is the room The Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution were both signed. This was also the room that became a shrine to the founding of the nation, where it proudly displayed the Liberty Bell and original paintings of our Founding Fathers. While we now know what eventually became of the Liberty Bell, President-elect Abraham Lincoln was able to see it before the bell had been removed. Abraham Lincoln’s body also laid in repose in this room for two days as the nation mourned his death. There’s also the Courtroom of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court where Pennsylvania’s Supreme court sat in the 1700’s. The most talked about event in this room was when on July 8th, 1776, a group of Pennsylvania militiamen stormed in and tore down the British King George the 3rd ‘s coat of arms. See what happens when you get a bunch of angry men? No coat of arms is safe. Now on the second floor is The Long Gallery. This is where receptions were held for visitors meeting with Pennsylvania’s governor, along with celebration dinners. But it wasn’t always used for fancy evenings with great food and the sounds of animated conversations and laughter. During the British occupation, the Long Gallery became a hospital for wounded American prisoners of war. I imagine it would be quite a surreal moment to have once been a wounded prisoner of war held here and then be able to once again walk these halls but as free citizens in a brand-new nation. There are a lot of cool rooms that you should definitely find time to check out, as the history you’ll see in them is awe inspiring. But before we move on, I want to leave you with one interesting fact about the day we celebrate our independence, July 4th. The motion to declare independence was approved on July 2nd and two days later, July 4th, Thomas Jefferson had the Declaration of Independence drafted. However, it wasn’t until later that the document was actually approved, and it wasn’t until August 2, 1776 that it was finally signed by all of the delegates. You’d think that would make our Independence Day August 2nd, or maybe even July 2nd, as that’s the day it was approved, but apparently, they were set on celebrating our independence on the 4th, so there you go. Maybe those of us who know this historical information should get together every August 2nd and light fireworks of our own! Remember, I’ll meet you on the other side of 6th street, walking along Chestnut Street, when you’re ready to continue on the tour!

Point #12
Signer's Walk

104 S 6th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Plaques
https://www.theconstitutional.com/blog/2018/08/08/signers-walk-founding-fathers-walk-fame

I never doubted for a minute you’d remember to meet me here. This sidewalk, running down Chestnut Street is called Signer’s Walk Just along the south side of Chestnut Street, between 6th and 7th street, lies a series of plaques along the sidewalk. No, these aren’t the Hollywood stars of the founding fathers… well actually, they kind of are. Each plaque in the ground embodies the likeness, occupation, signature, and colony of all 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence who, by bearing their name on this sacred break-up letter to England, risked their lives and set in stone one of the foundations on which our country is standing in 1776 and 1777. The plaques are conveniently organized by colony, north to south, so you can find your favorite colony and know which member of the continental congress to give credit to, except for Pennsylvania. The Keystone State’s plaque is located at the end of Chestnut and 6th. Oh Pennsylvania, you can’t get a win can you? First Hamilton misspelled your name in the Constitution, now this! There are many famous names along this Founding Fathers “Walk of Fame”, including but not limited to John Hancock, Thomas Jefferson, Samuel and John Adams, and Benjamin Franklin. While you gaze upon each and every plaque, allow me to fill the time with some fun facts about these signers and what document they stood for. First of all, did you know the Declaration wasn’t even signed on July 4, 1776? While it is true that this document was finalized and adopted on the 4th, it wasn’t actually signed by the majority of the writers until August 2nd of that year! There are a couple reasons for this delay, but it is mainly because New York's delegates didn’t get authorized to sign it until July 9 and it took two full weeks to get the Declaration to be engrossed, or written clearly on parchment. Here’s another fact for you, did you know that it took approximately 442 days from the time the “Shot Heard Around the World” was, well, shot, and the time the Declaration of Independence was adopted. You may be wondering why. Well I’ll tell you. Most of the signers viewed themselves as British subjects, and this little hustle and bustle was nothing more than a civil dispute, until King George III denounced the colonies in October 1775, in front of parliament! From that point forward the colonies felt that they needed indepence, as their rights were being denied. At the end of this street I’m gonna need you to cross over 7th Street and meet me at that corner.

Point #13
Directions

116 Ionic St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Ready to continue on our journey? Great! Turn left and we will head toward Jeweler’s Row.

Point #14
Jeweler's Row

701 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction :
https://jrow.org/

The street coming up on your right, Sansom street, is also known as Jeweler’s Row. If you want to detour and check it out, no problem, just come back this way so you can continue down 7th street. Sansom street is famous for being the oldest diamond district, comprised of over 300 wholesalers, retailers, and craftsmen. The name of this land of jewelry-related dreams is dubbed Jewelers Row. Many of these little mom and pop shops have been owned by the same family for 5 generations! Jeweler’s Row, otherwise known as Carstairs row, was designed by architect and builder Thomas Carstair from 1799 to 1820. These were designed for the developer William Sansom. This was the introduction of the Row house concept to the United States, along with being one of the first speculative housing developments. Unfortunately, alterations from the 19th and 20th centuries changed the Row, with the exception of 700, 730, and 732 Sansom blocks, which have since retained the original build. One area of controversy surrounding the Row took place fairly recently in 2016, where the real estate company Toll Brothers obtained demolition permits to destroy five buildings from 702 to 710 Sansom and replace it with a 29-story condominium tower. This led to much local ferocity towards the company and much opposition, even from a columnist in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Point #15
Directions

Washington Square, 210 W Washington Square, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Across the street you can see the path heading into Washington Square. When it’s safe, cross over and start walking down the trail.

Point #16
Directions

Washington Square, 210 W Washington Square, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Please take the diagonal turn to the left here and make your way to the center of Washington Square.

Point #17
Washington Square

620 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Park
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Square_(Philadelphia)

I love how good you are at following directions! Now look to you left, do you see that path that heads back out of the center of the square? When you’re done here, that’s the one you want to take. If for whatever reason you get turned around, just look at the American Flag pole and it’s the path to the left of that. While we’re still looking to the left, you will see one of my favorite stops on the tour. The history behind this lovely piece of ground is pretty interesting. This was originally claimed as a burial ground and pasture as city founder William Penn’s vision for a green and civic town. Fast forward into 1815, public walkways have been installed and over 60 species have been planted as part of a tree-planting program. This soon became the Southeast Square, later renamed Washington Square in 1825. This is the perfect spot to kick back, enjoy a picnic or sunbath, and take in the scenery of Independence National Historical Park. Taking a little jaunt down the walkway leads you to the Tomb of the Unknown Revolutionary War Soldier, or the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution. This quaint war memorial is built in honor of the thousands of soldiers who died and were buried in mass graves in the square; their sacrifice almost forgotten. With a statue of George Washington taking the center and an eternal flame lit brilliantly, one can experience the somber reverence this memorial commands, while dually taking in the serenity of the park. The remains are of a soldier whose allegiance was unknown, either British or Colonial, but still represents the many soldiers who are buried underneath the grounds that are occasionally unearthed and discovered in construction and maintenance projects. On the side of the tomb are the following quotes, one of which is from Washington’s farewell address, “Freedom is a light for which many men have died in darkness”, "The independence and liberty you possess are the work of joint councils and joint efforts of common dangers, suffering and success","In unmarked graves within this square lie thousands of unknown soldiers of Washington's Army who died of wounds and sickness during the Revolutionary War", and "Beneath this stone rests a soldier of Washington's army who died to give you liberty." And yes, there is a store two blocks down if you need tissues like me. Go ahead and take that path on the left now.

Point #18
Directions

180 S 6th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Walk straight ahead until you get to the street, which will be the corner of 6th and Walnut street. The path continues, but you have to get across a small intersection first. Just follow the navigation, AND the crosswalks.

Point #19

111 S Independence Mall W, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction :

Enter description here...

Point #20
Directions

110 S 5th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

See how Barry’s statue is pointing away from Independence Hall? If we could turn him a quarter turn so he would be pointing to your right, then he would be showing you the path I want you to take next! When you’re done here take that path to South Independence Mall. Then, meet me at the corner of Independence Mall and Library Street. You will know it is Library Street because it’s next to the Library....

Point #21
Independence Library

414 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Library
https://libwww.freelibrary.org/locations/independence-library

The building on the corner there is the Independence Library. Libraries always make me feel like whispering. But I won’t. It opened in February of 2001, and has proudly served as a community center for Chinatown, Old City, Society Hill, Washington Square West, and Queen Village. This quaint center of learning and Bookly education has all the features a library-body could dream of: Computers, printers, photocopiers, and even water fountains and bike racks! The name Indepence Library is one of the things that make this place special. Not only is it close to the Independence National Historical Park, but it serves as a reminder of what makes this area special. It is the town in which we drafted our independence. This library also has a kids area, where your little tikes can observe a beautiful mural that illustrates the changing of seasons. It also has a tribute to a favorite childhood story, Elmer the Multicultural Elephant, in the form of a carpet. Something truly special about this book palace is that it really is a product of the people. Citizens of the branch had been calling for a library branch for nearly 30 years before it was created in 1997. The library collection raised money through representatives of the community itself that were part of a fundraising committee. On the moon gate, one can find the names of the major donors that made this all possible. On a side note, how much do you love these cobblestone roads, still beautiful after 200 years of wear and tear? Let’s move on. Please stay on Independence Mall and walk past the Library

Point #22
Signer's Garden

414 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Garden
https://www.phlvisitorcenter.com/things-to-do/signers-garden

Take a right! This is Signer’s Garden. Head on in and have a look around! When you’re done taking selfies with The Signer, stay on this brick path that exits opposite of where you came in. As for the Signer’s Garden - This easily overlooked plot of land allows the visitor to honor those who risked their lives for the sake of their nation and take a moment of silence to reflect. The centerpiece of the garden is a statue, resembling a figure boldly and proudly raising his hand high, holding a roll of parchment. This statue is named “The Signer”, leading people to believe that it isn’t modeled after anyone in particular, or perhaps Thomas Jefferson or John Hancock. In reality, it resembles a lesser-known hero: George Clymer. Clymer was one of the only six people who signed both the Declaration and the US Constitution. Clymer was a Philidelphian his whole life, raised an orphan. He became a successful merchant, and by his twenties, had organized a mass opposition to a little act you may have heard of, the Stamp Act. He would soon be elected to represent Pennsylvania in the Second Continental Congress and sign the Declaration of Independence at that time. Clymer would later become a member of the Philadelphia Convention, and along with signing the Constitution, helped draft it. The plaque, citing the statue reads, “‘The Signer’ commemorates the spirit and deeds of all who devoted their lives to the cause of American Freedom”. Fun fact this garden plot used to be the private residence of a renowned painter named Gilbert Stuart. You may not know the name, but you surely know the work. The portrait of Washington on the dollar bill, yeah, that’s him. He also painted portraits of people such as King George III, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, John Quincy Adams, and James Madison to name a few. Arguably his most famous work was “The Athenaeum.” While unfinished due to the death of the subject, George Washington, it has become one of the most famous pieces of art in the United States.

Point #23
Second Bank of the United States

144 S 4th St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Bank
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Bank_of_the_United_States

I hope you got a good selfie with “The Signer”, posted it on social media and tagged UCPlaces! Now please turn right. The building on your left is the Second Bank of the United States. The bank's formal name, according to section 9 of its charter as passed by Congress, was "The President, Directors, and Company, of the Bank of the United States." Since the bank's closing in 1841, the edifice has performed a variety of functions. Today, it is part of Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia. The structure is open to the public free of charge and serves as an art gallery, housing a large collection of portraits of prominent early Americans painted by Charles Willson Peale and many others. ..

Point #24
Directions

4th St & Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Take a left and then a right on the red brick path so we can check out Robert Morris’s statue, which I’m sure is something you’ve been itching to check off your bucket list. You’re welcome.

Point #25
Robert Morris Statue

4th St & Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Statue
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Morris_(Bartlett)

Here’s a little shout out to Robert Morris. Not just because he’s an American Revolution financier and statesman, but because there’s a statue of him right here in front of us, so why not. Morris, always a pleasure, but we need to head to our left so we can continue down this brick path adventure. When you get to 4th Street, cross over it and then turn right.

Point #26
Directions

18th Century Garden, 339 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Take a right and meet me at the corner.

Point #27
Dolly Todd House

18th Century Garden, 339 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Historic House
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolley_Todd_House

Across the street at the corner of 4th and Walnut Streets is the Dolly Todd House. It’s the red brick house with yellow accents. Let’s go take a closer look. No, they don’t have antique dolls here, but they do have 18th century furnishings and antiques to show you what it was like to live in the home of future First Lady Dolly Madison, or at the time, Dolly Todd. She and her husband lived here from 1791-1793. This home was built in 1775 and was occupied by the Todd family until John Todd died of yellow fever in 1793. Dolly went on to marry future president James Madison and moved to the Madison Estate as the country’s 4th First Lady. Taking a step inside will lead you to a house full of Dolly’s pre-yellow fever dreams. You can see the kitchen, parlor, and office, fully furnished with 18th century furniture, kitchen appliances, and antiques. You can have the up close and personal yet distant experience of what it was like to live in the revolutionary times. Just past the Dolly Todd House is a beautiful 18th century English-inspired garden. Let’s walk down there and check it out.

Point #28
18th Century Garden

18th Century Garden, 339 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Garden
https://www.nps.gov/inde/planyourvisit/18thcenturygarden.htm

Turn left here through the wrought iron gate. Can you guess who dedicated this beautiful little garden? Yes you are correct it was Lady Bird Johnson, First Lady and wife of Lyndon B. Johnson. In 1966, she dedicated this garden in honor of those Founding Fathers and signers who risked their lives signing the Declaration of Independence. This 18th century garden is full of plants and flowers that were in style and grown in Pennsylvania in the 1700s. With a lovely gazebo included, this garden showcases the geometric patterns that were in style for these revolutionary gardeners. The garden is known for its lovely colors, which last year round by the way. This garden is also known for being a beautiful spot for wedding photos as well. So, if I’ve set the mood enough for you and you are planning to take photos here, you know who to thank.

Point #29
Directions

18th Century Garden, 339 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Please turn right here and then turn left on the path so I can show you Carpenter’s Hall and then the New Hall Military Museum.

Point #30
Carpenter's Hall

18th Century Garden, 339 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Historic Hall
https://www.carpentershall.org/

Please turn left here. Carpenter’s Hall is ahead on your left. This building is appropriately named after the company who built it, The Carpenters’ Company. Erected in 1770, this building is the oldest craft guild in America. It has hosted many different company’s, societies, and banks over the years. Here are just a few to reside within its walls: The First Continental Congress in 1774 Franklin’s Library Company The First and Second Banks of the United States The Light Horse of the city of Philadelphia, now known as the First Troop of Philadelphia City Cavalry, which is the oldest mounted military unit in continuous service in the U.S. Armed Forces responsible for protecting presidents. The Bank of Pennsylvania, which was robbed of $163,000 in 1798, becoming the first bank in America to be robbed. A member of the Carpenter’s Company and the porter of the bank were found guilty. But not only was Carpenter’s Hall occupied by different businesses, it has also been visited by some very important people: Queen Elizabeth the second, Chief Justice from France, King and Queen of Sweden, Presidents of the Czech Republic and South Korea, and of course, now you.

Point #31
New Hall Military Museum

321 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Museum
https://www.nps.gov/inde/planyourvisit/newhall.htm

You need to turn right here, but before you do, let me draw your attention to the building on your left. This is the New Hall Military Museum and unlike the Carpenter’s Hall, the place had one purpose, and one purpose only, to support the military. The museum is devoted to the Army, Navy, and Marines, and the role they played in early American military history. The first floor is about the marines and the second floor is for the navy and the army. It’s definitely a cool place to check out and see how things were for our military hundreds of years ago. When you are done exploring, take the path to 3rd Street.

Point #32
First Bank of the United States/Museum of the American Revolution

321 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Bank and Museum
https://www.amrevmuseum.org/

This is where we’ll turn left towards Chestnut, but first let me tell you about the building on your right, the First Bank of the United States. As you may have guessed from the name, this was indeed the First Bank of the United States. In 1791 the United States congress granted the bank a twenty year charter. In 1811 when the charter was up can you take a guess on what bank succeeded it? Naturally, the Second Bank of the United States. But that’s where the numerical successions ended, otherwise we’d have the Tenth Bank of the United States and so on. I wonder if they would have skipped the Thirteenth Bank of the United States because it would have been unlucky. Across from the bank is the Museum of the American Revolution! This museum is still relatively new, opening in 2017 on the anniversary of the first battle in the war: April 19. At the heart of Philly, this museum covers around 118,000 square feet and holds stories of enslaved and freed African Americans, Native Americans, the Founding Fathers and soldiers during the war. You can also find thousands of different pieces of art such as sculptures, textiles, weapons and books that all combine to piece together the story of the American Revolution. It has some amazing pieces of history that you won’t be able to see anywhere else. If you have time, you should head in and check it out. Just make sure to come back to this spot and keep heading up the sidewalk towards Chestnut. When you get to Chestnut, when it’s safe, cross over Chestnut and head left.

Point #33
Science History Institute

321 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Institute
https://www.sciencehistory.org/

Great job crossing the street! Now turn left. After you pass the red brick buildings you will get to the Science History Institute, followed by the National Liberty Museum. The Science History Institute is a cool place to learn about the history of science. It’s actually quite fascinating. It was founded in 1982 as a joint venture of the American Chemical Society and the University of Pennsylvania. Later the American Institute of Chemical Engineers became a co-founder, renaming the foundation to the Chemical Heritage Foundation. That’s a lot of incredibly smart people running the show. But it only gets better. In 2015 they merged with the Life Sciences Foundation, which now focuses on the history of chemistry, the history of science, the history of technology, trends in research and development, the impact of science on society, and relationships between science and art. With all of this going on under one roof, another name change seemed appropriate and in 2018 it was renamed the Science History Institute. The institute has a genius way of helping high school chemistry students understand science in a more interactive way, and what’s more interactive then role-playing? That’s right, they’ve created Science Matters role-playing games, for example, a hearing regarding a proposed Environmental Protection Agency Regulation to reduce plastic waste in the United States. The students debate the positive and negative perspectives of plastics from all sides, from activists and manufacturers to regulators and recyclers. Each side will argue for their position on plastics and then propose changes to the Regulation. The EPA Regulators will choose the regulation that best addresses the issue of plastic waste. While plastic is a particularly controversial contributor to the country’s solid-waste problem, it’s also vital to scientific and economic development to life as we know it, leaving the students to come up with a way to effectively reduce plastic waste in a practical, manageable way. The institute doesn’t just deal with environmental problems, it also researches mental problems, like defining and treating schizophrenia. A group of psychiatrists from around the world worked together to study this very complex disorder. It was in 1966 the World Health Organization created this group to answer the global questions: is schizophrenia only found in certain countries among certain cultures, or is it diagnosed merely on the perception of a society. For example, a person deemed schizophrenic in NYC would likely be diagnosed with manic depression in London. What was perceived as normal behavior in some countries was seen as illness in other countries. That led some psychiatrists to suggest that schizophrenia was an invention of Western societies. With this in mind, the psychiatrists from nine countries spent over a decade diagnosing, following, and analyzing more than a thousand patients. With every question answered more questions arose, and the journey in understanding this complicated disease continues.

Point #34
National Liberty Museum

321 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Museum
https://www.libertymuseum.org/

If you thought the Science History institute was fascinating, you’re going to love the National Liberty Museum. I’ll give you a little taste of the kinds of things you can expect from inside, but I don’t want to give away all of it’s treasures. The museum highlights the lives of some of our real-life heroes, I’m talking Jacki Robinson, Nelson Mandela, Jim Henson, and even the one and only, 2014 Nobel Peace Prize winner, Malala Yousafzai. If you’re not sure who Malala is, she’s reason alone to head inside and learn more about her. To say she’s one brave girl would be an understatement. It was between 2006 and 2007 that more than 30 percent of the girls in educational institutes dropped out because of the tirades given by taliban leader, Mullah Fazlullah, against education for girls. In 2008, Malala’s father took her to a local press club in Peshawar, Pakistan, where this brave 11-year old girl gave her first speech, “How dare the Taliban take away my basic right to education?”. Later that same year, the BBC came up with the idea of having a schoolgirl anonymously blog about her life and how it was affected by the growing influence of the Taliban. In 2009 Malala volunteered and began blogging her story. As you can imagine, the Taliban could not let this kind of rebellion go unanswered and two years later, when Malala was 15-years old, members of the taliban boarded a school bus she was on and shot her three times, leaving her for dead. But she didn’t die, she survived and continued to protest the taliban and fight for a girl’s right for an education. In 2014 a 17-year old Malala was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, becoming the youngest person in history to win this prestigious award. When you reach the end of this street, turn right on 4th street.

Point #35
Directions

321 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Please turn right.

Point #36
Benjamin Franklin Museum

321 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Museum
https://www.nps.gov/inde/planyourvisit/benjaminfranklinmuseum.htm

Right now we’re heading to the Benjamin Franklin Museum. It’s pretty unique as the entrance is a tunnel going through a building. I’ll tell you a little about it on our way. Once you’re there you’ll be able to read more about Franklin’s courtyard and after you explore the museum you’ll come out knowing just about everything you’d ever need to know about Benjamin Franklin. You’ll also see a lot of his famous quotes, so tag us and let us know which one is your favorite!. I’ll tell you a couple of mine: “We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.”, “Three may keep a secret, if two of them are dead.”, and “The early bird might get the worm, but the second mouse will get the cheese.” So true. Take a right up ahead on Market street.

Point #37
Directions

310 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Turn right!

Point #38
Directions

310 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

On your right, just before the United States Post office you’ll see the tunnel I was telling you about. Head on in and check out Franklin’s Court. There are some plaques there, a little garden and some benches to relax on. When you’re done, come back out through the tunnel and turn right so you are continuing down Market street.

Point #39
Directions

1 S 3rd St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Yay, you remembered to take a right!!! Keep going straight and I’ll let you know when to turn next.

Point #40
Directions

1 S 3rd St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

By the way, just past Bank Street you might be able to smell the mouthwatering philly cheesesteaks coming from the restaurants on your right. You might want to consider stopping inside one and getting a bite to eat. Afterwards, keep going straight and take your next left at 2nd Street.

Point #41
Directions

18 N 2nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Yep, take this left, heading up 2nd street.

Point #42
Christ Church

40 N 2nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Church
https://www.christchurchphila.org/

Up on your left is Philly's historical Christ Church. Feel free to take your time and wander around, just make sure when you’re done to come back to where you entered so you can keep heading up 2nd. Christ Church Burial Ground, which has also been referred to as 5th Street Burial Ground, is one of America’s most unique Colonial and Revolution-era graveyards that dates back over 300 years ago, right in the heart of historic Philadelphia. There are almost 4000 members of Christ Church buried on these two beautiful acres, the earliest of which was buried in 1720. Since then over 2,500 gravestones have eroded and disappeared over time, leaving only 1,400 markers, many so worn you can no longer read the inscriptions. Regardless of whether the markers are still visible, it doesn’t change the fact that this burial ground is the final resting place of five signers of the Declaration of Independence: Benjamin Franklin, Joseph Hewes, Francis Hopkinson, George Ross, and Dr. Benjamin Rush, along with the founders of the U.S. Navy and many of America’s early medical pioneers. So how did this burial ground come to be? I’m so glad you asked. It all began long ago, when the churchyard of Christ Church was used to bury the members of its congregation, which by the way, is actually a very common Christian and European practice. But there came a time when the churchyard was filled and burials began to take place on the outskirts of the surrounding cities, largely to prevent disease from spreading as the yellow fever epidemic grew. In an effort to have a central place for its members to be buried, Christ Church purchased two acres of land on the outskirts of town, at the corner of 5th and Arch Streets, becoming Christ Church Burial Ground. Um, is it just me, or do you think they could have come up with at least a slightly more creative name? When you wander through the cemetery and take in the rich history that surrounds you, be sure to have a few pennies in your pocket. Because you’ll want to add your own coins to Benjamin Franklin’s burial site. In addition to being a symbol for good luck, throwing a penny on Franklin’s site is a nod to his motto that “a penny saved is a penny earned.” Within this cemetery, Benjamin Franklin’s grave is the most asked about, and with so many prominent historical figures buried here, one might wonder who’s second. According to John Hopkins, the burial ground coordinator, it’s Gerald J. Connelly Jr., buried in 1991. Connelly isn’t as well known as some of the more famous occupants surrounding him, and if it weren’t for his epitaph etched into his granite head stone which reads: “Seaman…Soldier…Safecracker”, you might just walk on by him. In life, Connelly was a world-class locksmith whom the FBI would call when they needed to bust into a safe believed to hold some shady, not quite on the up and up, gains. While his profession was completely constitutional, Connelly knew Safecracker sounded more criminal and would therefore get people talking and wondering why an unsavory sort of person would be buried among some of our nation's greatest. Some might even say he “cracked” his way into this one. Connelly’s talent even caught the attention of legendary FBI Director HJ. Edgar Hoover. According to Carolyn Connelly, Gerald’s wife, “Hoover gave my husband a copy of his book ‘Masters of Deceit’ and in the inscription he wrote, “The only man with sweaty palms that I trust.” There you have it, from unknown graves from the early 1700’s, to some of the most famous names in America’s history, to a Safecracker in the 20th century, Christ Church Burial Ground is one of a kind.

Point #43
Directions

2nd St & Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

As we make our way to Arch street, on your left you’ll see some really cool galleries that you should definitely explore if you have time. I’m talking about the Muse Gallery, Hamilton Family Arts Center, and a Glass Gallery. When you get to Arch street, as always look both ways and when it’s safe to cross head to the other side and take a left.

Point #44
Directions

2nd St & Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

Now turn left and we’re super close to our next stop, which is the Betsy Ross House.

Point #45
Betsy Ross House

Arch St & 3rd St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Historic House
http://historicphiladelphia.org/betsy-ross-house/what-to-see/

We’re almost to Betsy Ross’s house. It will be on your right. You can’t miss it. So, History is full of controversy and the Betsy Ross story is no exception. The Betsy Ross House is claimed to be the site where the seamstress and flag-maker Betsy Ross lived and where she is said to have sewn the first American Flag. You heard me right, I used the word ‘claimed’ and for a good reason. There simply is no credible historical evidence — letters, diaries, newspaper accounts, bills of sale — that Ross (then known as Elizabeth Claypoole) either made or had a hand in designing the American flag before it made its debut in 1777. The story cropped up in 1870, almost 100 years after the first flag was supposedly sewn, when William Canby, Ross’s grandson, told the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia that his grandmother made the flag at George Washington’s request. Canby’s sole evidence was from family members who through affidavit claimed it to be true. Based on just the word of family members, why would the country believe this grandson’s claim? How would she have known George Washington enough to result in his request of her to sew the flag? We can’t use the famous 1893 painting of Ross sitting in her Philadelphia parlor with the sun beaming down on the flag in her lap as proof, because believe it or not, that is actually a scene invented by Charles H. Weisgerber. That’s right, the painting was a creation from an artist who was able to profit from the Betsy Ross legend. Again, without more concrete proof that it was Ross to sew the flag, why did the country believe it so easily? Let’s take a look at who Betsy Ross was…After attending a Quaker school, she was apprenticed to an upholsterer named William Webster. While working for him, she fell in love and eloped with fellow apprentice John Ross, a nephew of George Ross Jr., one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. At one point Betsy was expelled from her Quaker congregation and shunned by her family, which is when she and John started their own upholstery business and joined Christ Church, where George Washington worshiped when he was in Philadelphia on business. But it wasn’t until March of 2015, that the associate curator of Mount Vernon, Washington’s Virginia estate, unearthed a receipt for 55 pounds, 12 shillings and sixpence made out to one “John Ross of Philadelphia” for the linens for three beds, including canopies, sheets and covers, made from cotton calico and lined with muslin. The only John Ross in Philly at the time was Betsy’s husband. This receipt is the only actual documentation that these two icons of the American Revolution, Betsy and George, actually met. When you go through the Betsy Ross home, now museum, you will be able to read more about the story of how Betsy worked with George to design and eventually create the American flag. It’s a great story, and one that is easy to believe. But whether it’s a beautiful mythical story or one that actually took place…is one we’ll never know for certain. We want to keep following Arch Street until we get to Independence Mall.

Point #46
Directions

304 Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Directions

We need to get to the other side of Arch Street. Pick a crosswalk and do so now, then continue walking.

Point #47
Arch Street Meeting House

304 Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Church
http://www.historicasmh.org/

Heading straight on Arch street, you’ll see the Historic Arch Street Meeting House on your left. This is the oldest Friends Meeting House still in use in Philly today. Inside of this building you can find a whole variety of things! From rows of wooden benches to plain windows and…more benches… There is clearly a lot going on. This is where the Society of Friends, better known as Quakers, used to meet. You may be wondering, “Gosh, how poor must these Quakers have been to not be able to afford even a few decorations?” Rest assured, there is a legitimate reason why this place is so empty; it is because they wanted to integrate their beliefs in simplicity and equality into the building itself. Though it appears their ideas of equality were very specific and limited, for it used to be that boys and girls had their own staircases. They even added a “modesty board,” which is really just a long piece of sexist wood that runs along the side of the girls’ staircase to keep the boys from looking at the girls’ legs. You know, since a female’s legs are basically the sinful, tempting legs of Satan himself. Other than the modesty board and staircases, the Quaker’s beliefs in equality were well portrayed. When you get to the next intersection, please take the crosswalk and continue on Arch Street.

Point #48
Benjamin Franklin's Grave

500 Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Grave
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ_Church_Burial_Ground

We are coming up on the entrance to the Christ Church Burial Ground. Here you can see the tombstone marking Benjamin Franklin’s grave. Franklin was a dignified man in life and his death should be no different. In the days before his death, Franklin was suffering from an illness which was causing pus to fill his lungs. His breathing had become laborious and painful, and then for no apparent reason the pain went away for one day. Taking advantage of this short respite, Franklin asked that his bed be made properly so that he would have a dignified death. On April 17th, 1790, he passed away peacefully with his grandsons William Temple and Bennie at his side. Here are a few of my favorite quotes by Benjamin Franklin when it came to life and death: “I wake up every morning at nine and grab for the morning paper. Then I look at the obituary page. If my name is not on it, I get up.” “If you would not be forgotten as soon as you are dead, either write something worth reading or do things worth writing.” “Life’s Tragedy is that we get old too soon and wise too late.” Lastly, these moving words spoken by Benjamin Franklin at his friend’s funeral: “We are spirits. That bodies should be lent us, while they can afford us pleasure, assist us in acquiring knowledge, or in doing good to our fellow creatures, is a kind and benevolent act of God.” If you want to get a closer look at Benjamin Franklin’s grave, you can go inside the Christ Church cemetery for a minimal fee. Considering all of the historical graves within these walls, it’s well worth it. After you are done here, please keep walking the direction that we have been, and cross over Independence Mall to get to our last stop - the Free Quaker Meeting House.

Point #49
Free Quaker Meeting House

500 Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA

  • Distance : 0
  • Attraction : Church
https://www.phlvisitorcenter.com/things-to-do/free-quaker-meeting-house

And here we are - the LAST stop on this tour. Don’t get sad! We have other tours in Philadelphia that you can explore with the UCPlaces app. So, this red brick building here on the corner is the Free Quaker Meeting House. What’s the difference between a “Free” Quaker and just a regular old Quaker? Well, during the American Revolution some of the Pennsylvania Quakers supported the Revolution. Most of the Quakers however, were completely against any type of wars. So the rebellious, pro-revolution Quakers broke off from the regular Quakers and called themselves “Free Quakers”. There were 35 of these religious rebels and among them was Betsy Ross. Whew! That was quite the tour! Did you have fun? I did. I had an absolute blast, actually. Philadelphia is so full of interesting history. Promise me that you will join me on a tour again soon? Thanks. Until next time, so long and happy touring!